Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2

Star Wars: The Clone Wars 2

Probably the most noticeable problem was the voice-acting. Director Dave Filoni must have studied toothpaste commercials when making this film. While Obi-Wan’s voice matches Ewan McGregor’s rather droll performance, it’s Anakin’s voice that grates the most. Almost every sentence is enunciated with no semblance of realism, making Mark Hamill’s Luke sound like a Cassavetes film. Ahsoka’s lines are delivered with such whiny irritation that any attempt to present a likable character were flushed down the proverbial crapper.

The direction of the action is notably dull. Any expectations of originality or true thrills are kept on a tenuous thread until enough of the physical gags (usually based on the incompetence of enemy droids) deflate your sense of enjoyment. And almost every scene is deeply derivative of a moment from the previous movies.

The evident problem with this film is that it’s not a film. Lucas decided to release the show’s pilot in feature-film form. This means that we get no story, and especially no sense of character development (Anakin’s gradual lean to the Dark Side is utterly ignored). It may work as an extended TV series, but as 90 minutes of cinema, The Clone Wars feels insignificant and dull.

But what’s worse is that the genius of the original Star Wars trilogy was an adventure that could inspire children and adults alike. As of late, it feels as if Lucas has lost sight of this. The Phantom Menace has blatant scenes and characters to appeal to the youngest age group possible, and it was often embarrassing to an adult audience. The Clone Wars is even worse, a series aimed solely for children, with appropriately unnatural kids-TV voice acting, deliberate marketing strategies (you almost feel as if the introduction of Ahsoka is a result of Lucas’s PR agents targeting a lagging demographic- teenage girls), and humor inaccessible to only the youngest age groups. The enjoyment of Star Wars really does feel like a long time ago.